October 18-20 | Tucson, AZ

The Research Institution GAP Fund and Accelerator Program Summit

Questions arise on Y Combinator’s role in startup correction | TechCrunch

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October 18-20, 2023 / Tucson, AZ
The annual summit for research institution gap fund and accelerator programs, including proof of concept programs, startup accelerators, and university venture funds

The Story

Y Combinator, or YC for short, is the world’s best-known accelerator. Its expanding cohort sizes, twice-yearly cadence and “standard deal” made it a trendsetting startup program; one that has sufficient heft to influence the overall direction of the early-stage market for funding upstart technology companies. And, after starting life offering “about $20,000 for 6% of a company,” YC raised its terms in 2020 to “$125,000 for 7% equity on a post-money SAFE,” along with reduced pro-rata rights “to 4% of subsequent rounds.”

That changed again in early 2022, when YC added a $375,000 note to its deal, offered on an uncapped basis but with most-favored-nation status. In essence, YC conserved its ability to collect 7% of startup equity early, with extra capital provided to its portfolio companies to put to work.

Over the last few years, YC has raised the valuation bar for its startups, from around $333,333 (6% of a company for $20,000) to $1.79 million (7% of a company for $125,000). Even more, the additional capital it now offers on an uncapped basis likely worked to cement early-stage startup expectations that their accelerator valuation was market valid.

Abhinaya Konduru, an investor at Midwest-focused venture fund M25, told TechCrunch that her firm has “been skeptical of a couple of national accelerators’ valuation practices from an investing standpoint even before the last couple of years,” adding that changes to early-stage valuations from select accelerators — she did not call any program out by name — “made it even harder to consider those companies for an investment to the point where [M25] stopped looking at them.”

YC companies from the last few batches, then, are now swimming in a dramatically changed market with 2020 and 2021 prices around their necks. How many will manage to keep their heads above water, avoiding down rounds or shutdowns, won’t be clear for some time. But that hasn’t stopped discontent from bubbling up among some investors and startup operators on public forums like Twitter, pieces of it aimed at YC for what some consider to be a role in helping inflate startup asset prices for early-stage concerns past the point of reasonableness.

Get full article here: Questions arise on Y Combinator’s role in startup correction | TechCrunch

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